Route Setting: #1 Think Deeply

This is Mitsuo Yamamoto, route setter myself and founder of Tokyo Powder.
I put up my first hold in a commercial gym 13 years ago, and I’m fortunate to have gained a lot of experience through setting. With my advancement as a setter, I helped to conduct courses, and in order to give better explanation and guidance, I compiled the details of setting into sentences and documents so that I could systematically re-examine my knowledge and thoughts.


Climbing skills, route setting skills, words and common expressions used in discussions, quality of problems or lines, the effect of it, setting environment, training environment, organization – these are all part and parcel of route setting. These elements can’t be measured numerically, so I don’t have a scale at which it can be judged or evaluated in that manner. But, I would like to share my experience and knowledge with as many people as possible to help route setters grow.

Continue reading “Route Setting: #1 Think Deeply”

Introducing recycled PET packages

One month has passed since our bottle reuse program started. Although we have yet to collect enough products to be released, we are confident that we will be able to create a sustainable cycle in the long run with the support of our stores.

From around August this year, we also have decided to switch all our packed products to include recycled content. We are currently conducting a final selection of materials with suppliers who possess the best technology to make this happen.

If all goes well, we will start using these in mid-August to early September.
Continue reading “Introducing recycled PET packages”

Support for the Japanese athlete participating in the Paraclimbing

I have spoken directly with people on social media, podcasts and others, but no matter how much I criticize this matter, the situation doesn’t change.

Our athlete had the intention to participate in the World Championships, but due to a quick change in venue and schedule, it was becoming complicated.

I decided to provide direct financial support, after reading a post from the Paraclimbing Association of Japan on its Facebook page.

Continue reading “Support for the Japanese athlete participating in the Paraclimbing”

Reuse with emotion.

The reuse of bottles, a project started since the founding of Tokyo Powder, has had a new start this year, with the cooperation of dealers nationwide.

The REUSE plan for individuals continues to increase the novelty of the program. The collection store list will be updated in late April and is currently only for Japan.

Click here for bottle collection stores (Only in Japan)

Continue reading “Reuse with emotion.”

100% Renewable Energy Source

100% renewable energy should have been our first step in establishing Tokyo Powder.

There are a lot of hurdles involved to use renewable energy to cover only the electrical consumption in the company’s operation. Carbon and other pollutants are emitted at the time of capital investment and production of equipment, as well as restrictions on recycling at the time of disposal, methods of production – all options the most suitable for our business activities and keeping costs low.
Continue reading “100% Renewable Energy Source”

Environmental impact of raw materials and suppliers

A while ago, an article of the impact of chalk appeared on Climbing Magazine website. It is interesting in many ways, and it talks about the details of mining magnesite and extracting Magnesium Carbonate from it, and the manufacturers that sell it as commodities. Only last year, pollution control was implemented at the magnesite mining factory in China.

CLIMBING.COM
The Hidden Environmental Cost of Climbing Chalk

Continue reading “Environmental impact of raw materials and suppliers”

Shogo and Bukatsudo

About 10 years ago, I thought I could climb well. I tried hard every day and on more difficult routes. One day, in front of a difficult route, I lamented that I couldn’t achieve it.

“Now, climb it well” Shogo said, and from that day on my long days of trial and error began.

Thinking back, I remember the words Shogo said clearly: “Don’t stretch your arms completely, a slight bend is better. Move your legs more, your freedom increases. You will get more power!”

The days of pursuing questions began. What is a good climb? What is good? What is strong? What is efficient, yet powerful? The first year of trial and error was rather poor, but strangely, I remember the feeling of change rather than the stress.

The turning point for me was the direction of foot output. That was the moment when it hit me and all the questions I had seemed resolved. My movement changed dramatically and results started to appear. But solving these problems raised new questions, a never-ending cycle in search of what is best.

Continue reading “Shogo and Bukatsudo”